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At first they saw nothing around them. Their intense happiness isolated them from all the rest of the world, and they only spoke in broken words, which are the tokens of a joy so extreme that they seem rather the expression of sorrow.

Suddenly Edmond saw the gloomy, pale, and threatening countenance of Fernand, as it was defined in the shadow. By a movement for which he could scarcely account to himself, the young Catalan placed his hand on the knife at his belt.

Do you not remember him? But Fernand, instead of responding to this amiable gesture, remained mute and trembling.

This look told him all, and his anger waxed hot. If I believed that, I would place my arm under yours and go with you to Marseilles, leaving the house to return to it no more. Fernand became deadly pale. And at these words the young girl fixed her imperious look on the Catalan, who, as if fascinated by it, came slowly towards Edmond, and offered him his hand.

Wretched—wretched that I am! The young man stopped suddenly, looked around him, and perceived Caderousse sitting at table with Danglars, under an arbor. Are you really in such a hurry that you have no time to pass the time of day with your friends?

Fernand looked at them both with a stupefied air, but did not say a word. Fernand wiped away the perspiration steaming from his brow, and slowly entered the arbor, whose shade seemed to restore somewhat of calmness to his senses, and whose coolness somewhat of refreshment to his exhausted body.

Fernand gave a groan, which resembled a sob, and dropped his head into his hands, his elbows leaning on the table. You are laughing at him, Caderousse. Is she not free to love whomsoever she will? But I thought you were a Catalan, and they told me the Catalans were not men to allow themselves to be supplanted by a rival.

It was even told me that Fernand, especially, was terrible in his vengeance. These things always come on us more severely when they come suddenly. Danglars shuddered at this unexpected attack, and turned to Caderousse, whose countenance he scrutinized, to try and detect whether the blow was premeditated; but he read nothing but envy in a countenance already rendered brutal and stupid by drunkenness. Caderousse raised his glass to his mouth with unsteady hand, and swallowed the contents at a gulp.

Fernand dashed his on the ground. Look, Fernand, your eyes are better than mine. I believe I see double. You know wine is a deceiver; but I should say it was two lovers walking side by side, and hand in hand. Heaven forgive me, they do not know that we can see them, and they are actually embracing! Come this way, and let us know when the wedding is to be, for Fernand here is so obstinate he will not tell us. See, look at Fernand, and follow his example; he is well-behaved! At this Fernand recollected her threat of dying if Edmond died, and dropped again heavily on his seat.

Danglars looked at the two men, one after the other, the one brutalized by liquor, the other overwhelmed with love. Yet this Catalan has eyes that glisten like those of the vengeful Spaniards, Sicilians, and Calabrians, and the other has fists big enough to crush an ox at one blow. My friends will be there, I hope; that is to say, you are invited, M. Danglars, and you, Caderousse. Fernand opened his mouth to reply, but his voice died on his lips, and he could not utter a word.

You are in a hurry, captain! Danglars; for when we have suffered a long time, we have great difficulty in believing in good fortune. But it is not selfishness alone that makes me thus in haste; I must go to Paris.

Besides, I shall only take the time to go and return. Ah, this letter gives me an idea—a capital idea! Is it my affair? I could drink four more such bottles; they are no bigger than cologne flasks.

I forget. This drunken Caderousse has made me lose the thread of my sentence. Prove it, Danglars. I have answered for you. Fernand rose impatiently. Have you that means? But why should I meddle in the matter?

None, on my word! I hate him! I confess it openly. I have always had more dread of a pen, a bottle of ink, and a sheet of paper, than of a sword or pistol.

The Catalan watched him until Caderousse, almost overcome by this fresh assault on his senses, rested, or rather dropped, his glass upon the table. Give me your arm, and let us go. Come along, Danglars, and let the young gentleman return to the Catalans if he chooses.

When they had advanced about twenty yards, Danglars looked back and saw Fernand stoop, pick up the crumpled paper, and putting it into his pocket then rush out of the arbor towards Pillon.

He said he was going to the Catalans, and he is going to the city. Hallo, Fernand! You are coming, my boy! The apartment destined for the purpose was spacious and lighted by a number of windows, over each of which was written in golden letters for some inexplicable reason the name of one of the principal cities of France; beneath these windows a wooden balcony extended the entire length of the house.

Various rumors were afloat to the effect that the owners of the Pharaon had promised to attend the nuptial feast; but all seemed unanimous in doubting that an act of such rare and exceeding condescension could possibly be intended. Danglars, however, who now made his appearance, accompanied by Caderousse, effectually confirmed the report, stating that he had recently conversed with M. In fact, a moment later M.

With the entrance of M. Morrel, Danglars and Caderousse were despatched in search of the bridegroom to convey to him the intelligence of the arrival of the important personage whose coming had created such a lively sensation, and to beseech him to make haste. The old man was attired in a suit of glistening watered silk, trimmed with steel buttons, beautifully cut and polished.

His thin but wiry legs were arrayed in a pair of richly embroidered clocked stockings, evidently of English manufacture, while from his three-cornered hat depended a long streaming knot of white and blue ribbons. Thus he came along, supporting himself on a curiously carved stick, his aged countenance lit up with happiness, looking for all the world like one of the aged dandies of , parading the newly opened gardens of the Luxembourg and Tuileries.

As Danglars approached the disappointed lover, he cast on him a look of deep meaning, while Fernand, as he slowly paced behind the happy pair, who seemed, in their own unmixed content, to have entirely forgotten that such a being as himself existed, was pale and abstracted; occasionally, however, a deep flush would overspread his countenance, and a nervous contraction distort his features, while, with an agitated and restless gaze, he would glance in the direction of Marseilles, like one who either anticipated or foresaw some great and important event.

She moved with the light, free step of an Arlesienne or an Andalusian. Edmond, at the approach of his patron, respectfully placed the arm of his affianced bride within that of M. Morrel, who, forthwith conducting her up the flight of wooden steps leading to the chamber in which the feast was prepared, was gayly followed by the guests, beneath whose heavy tread the slight structure creaked and groaned for the space of several minutes.

Morrel was seated at his right hand, Danglars at his left; while, at a sign from Edmond, the rest of the company ranged themselves as they found it most agreeable. Then they began to pass around the dusky, piquant, Arlesian sausages, and lobsters in their dazzling red cuirasses, prawns of large size and brilliant color, the echinus with its prickly outside and dainty morsel within, the clovis, esteemed by the epicures of the South as more than rivalling the exquisite flavor of the oyster, North.

Danglars looked towards Fernand, whose excitable nature received and betrayed each fresh impression. I should say that you were the happiest man alive at this instant. Just assume the tone and manner of a husband, and see how she will remind you that your hour is not yet come! The bride blushed, while Fernand, restless and uneasy, seemed to start at every fresh sound, and from time to time wiped away the large drops of perspiration that gathered on his brow.

Morrel, to whom, next to my father, I owe every blessing I enjoy, every difficulty has been removed. Fernand closed his eyes, a burning sensation passed across his brow, and he was compelled to support himself by the table to prevent his falling from his chair; but in spite of all his efforts, he could not refrain from uttering a deep groan, which, however, was lost amid the noisy felicitations of the company. Commend me to a sailor for going the quick way to work! So, you see, our papers were quickly written out, and certainly do not come very expensive.

Tomorrow morning I start for Paris; four days to go, and the same to return, with one day to discharge the commission entrusted to me, is all the time I shall be absent. I shall be back here by the first of March, and on the second I give my real marriage feast. Around the table reigned that noisy hilarity which usually prevails at such a time among people sufficiently free from the demands of social position not to feel the trammels of etiquette.

Such as at the commencement of the repast had not been able to seat themselves according to their inclination rose unceremoniously, and sought out more agreeable companions.

Everybody talked at once, without waiting for a reply and each one seemed to be contented with expressing his or her own thoughts. As for Fernand himself, he seemed to be enduring the tortures of the damned; unable to rest, he was among the first to quit the table, and, as though seeking to avoid the hilarious mirth that rose in such deafening sounds, he continued, in utter silence, to pace the farther end of the salon.

Caderousse approached him just as Danglars, whom Fernand seemed most anxious to avoid, had joined him in a corner of the room. I cannot help thinking it would have been a great pity to have served him that trick you were planning yesterday.

Upon my soul, that future captain of mine is a lucky dog! I only wish he would let me take his place. At the same instant his ear caught a sort of indistinct sound on the stairs, followed by the measured tread of soldiery, with the clanking of swords and military accoutrements; then came a hum and buzz as of many voices, so as to deaden even the noisy mirth of the bridal party, among whom a vague feeling of curiosity and apprehension quelled every disposition to talk, and almost instantaneously the most deathlike stillness prevailed.

The sounds drew nearer. Three blows were struck upon the panel of the door. The company looked at each other in consternation. Uneasiness now yielded to the most extreme dread on the part of those present. Every eye was turned towards the young man who, spite of the agitation he could not but feel, advanced with dignity, and said, in a firm voice:. Morrel felt that further resistance or remonstrance was useless.

He saw before him an officer delegated to enforce the law, and perfectly well knew that it would be as unavailing to seek pity from a magistrate decked with his official scarf, as to address a petition to some cold marble effigy.

There are situations which the heart of a father or a mother cannot be made to understand. Your son has probably neglected some prescribed form or attention in registering his cargo, and it is more than probable he will be set at liberty directly he has given the information required, whether touching the health of his crew, or the value of his freight.

The scene of the previous night now came back to his mind with startling clearness. The painful catastrophe he had just witnessed appeared effectually to have rent away the veil which the intoxication of the evening before had raised between himself and his memory. Never mind where he is, let you and I go and see what is to be done for our poor friends.

A carriage awaited him at the door; he got in, followed by two soldiers and the magistrate, and the vehicle drove off towards Marseilles. This second departure was followed by a long and fearful state of terrified silence on the part of those who were left behind. Instinctively Fernand drew back his chair. I only hope the mischief will fall upon the head of whoever wrought it.

Her grief, which she had hitherto tried to restrain, now burst out in a violent fit of hysterical sobbing. Morrel back. No doubt, now, we shall hear that our friend is released!

He was very pale. I am determined to tell them all about it. The vessel did touch at Elba, where he quitted it, and passed a whole day in the island. Now, should any letters or other documents of a compromising character be found upon him, will it not be taken for granted that all who uphold him are his accomplices?

With the rapid instinct of selfishness, Caderousse readily perceived the solidity of this mode of reasoning; he gazed, doubtfully, wistfully, on Danglars, and then caution supplanted generosity.

If he be innocent, of course he will be set at liberty; if guilty, why, it is no use involving ourselves in a conspiracy. Policar Morrel, who served under the other government, and who does not altogether conceal what he thinks on the subject, you are strongly suspected of regretting the abdication of Napoleon. I should have feared to injure both Edmond and yourself, had I divulged my own apprehensions to a soul. I am too well aware that though a subordinate, like myself, is bound to acquaint the shipowner with everything that occurs, there are many things he ought most carefully to conceal from all else.

I fully authorize you at once to assume the command of the Pharaon , and look carefully to the unloading of her freight. Private misfortunes must never be allowed to interfere with business. Morrel; but do you think we shall be permitted to see our poor Edmond? But now hasten on board, I will join you there ere long. So saying, the worthy shipowner quitted the two allies, and proceeded in the direction of the Palais de Justice.

Do you still feel any desire to stand up in his defence? I only wish I could see it now as plainly as I saw it lying all crushed and crumpled in a corner of the arbor. And now I think of it, by Heavens, he may have sent the letter itself! Fortunately, for me, the handwriting was disguised.

As I before said, I thought the whole thing was a joke, nothing more. It seems, however, that I have unconsciously stumbled upon the truth. You will see, Danglars, that it will turn out an unlucky job for both of us. If any harm come of it, it should fall on the guilty person; and that, you know, is Fernand. How can we be implicated in any way? All we have got to do is, to keep our own counsel, and remain perfectly quiet, not breathing a word to any living soul; and you will see that the storm will pass away without in the least affecting us.

I am, temporarily, commander of the Pharaon , with the certainty of being permanently so, if that fool of a Caderousse can be persuaded to hold his tongue. Morrel had agreed to meet him. In this case, however, although the occasion of the entertainment was similar, the company was strikingly dissimilar. The guests were still at table, and the heated and energetic conversation that prevailed betrayed the violent and vindictive passions that then agitated each dweller of the South, where unhappily, for five centuries religious strife had long given increased bitterness to the violence of party feeling.

The magistrates freely discussed their political views; the military part of the company talked unreservedly of Moscow and Leipsic, while the women commented on the divorce of Josephine. It was not over the downfall of the man, but over the defeat of the Napoleonic idea, that they rejoiced, and in this they foresaw for themselves the bright and cheering prospect of a revivified political existence. In a word, an almost poetical fervor prevailed. I really must pray you to excuse me, but—in truth—I was not attending to the conversation.

But there—now take him—he is your own for as long as you like. Villefort, I beg to remind you my mother speaks to you. What I was saying, Villefort, was, that the Bonapartists had not our sincerity, enthusiasm, or devotion.

Napoleon is the Mahomet of the West, and is worshipped by his commonplace but ambitious followers, not only as a leader and lawgiver, but also as the personification of equality. Come, come, do not strip the latter of his just rights to bestow them on the Corsican, who, to my mind, has usurped quite enough.

The only difference consists in the opposite character of the equality advocated by these two men; one is the equality that elevates, the other is the equality that degrades; one brings a king within reach of the guillotine, the other elevates the people to a level with the throne.

Still, marquise, it has been so with other usurpers—Cromwell, for instance, who was not half so bad as Napoleon, had his partisans and advocates. But I excuse it, it is impossible to expect the son of a Girondin to be free from a small spice of the old leaven. What avails recrimination over matters wholly past recall?

For my own part, I have laid aside even the name of my father, and altogether disown his political principles. He was—nay, probably may still be—a Bonapartist, and is called Noirtier; I, on the contrary, am a staunch royalist, and style myself de Villefort.

Let what may remain of revolutionary sap exhaust itself and die away with the old trunk, and condescend only to regard the young shoot which has started up at a distance from the parent tree, without having the power, any more than the wish, to separate entirely from the stock from which it sprung.

Come, now, I have hopes of obtaining what I have been for years endeavoring to persuade the marquise to promise; namely, a perfect amnesty and forgetfulness of the past.

I promise you it affords me as little pleasure to revive it as it does you. All I ask is, that Villefort will be firm and inflexible for the future in his political principles. But bear in mind, that should there fall in your way anyone guilty of conspiring against the government, you will be so much the more bound to visit the offence with rigorous punishment, as it is known you belong to a suspected family.

I have already successfully conducted several public prosecutions, and brought the offenders to merited punishment. But we have not done with the thing yet. Napoleon, in the Island of Elba, is too near France, and his proximity keeps up the hopes of his partisans. Marseilles is filled with half-pay officers, who are daily, under one frivolous pretext or other, getting up quarrels with the royalists; from hence arise continual and fatal duels among the higher classes of persons, and assassinations in the lower.

As Villefort observes, it is a great act of folly to have left such a man between Corsica, where he was born, and Naples, of which his brother-in-law is king, and face to face with Italy, the sovereignty of which he coveted for his son. I never was in a law-court; I am told it is so very amusing!

The prisoner whom you there see pale, agitated, and alarmed, instead of—as is the case when a curtain falls on a tragedy—going home to sup peacefully with his family, and then retiring to rest, that he may recommence his mimic woes on the morrow,—is removed from your sight merely to be reconducted to his prison and delivered up to the executioner. I leave you to judge how far your nerves are calculated to bear you through such a scene.

Of this, however, be assured, that should any favorable opportunity present itself, I will not fail to offer you the choice of being present. I have already recorded sentence of death, five or six times, against the movers of political conspiracies, and who can say how many daggers may be ready sharpened, and only waiting a favorable opportunity to be buried in my heart?

Suppose, for instance, the prisoner, as is more than probable, to have served under Napoleon—well, can you expect for an instant, that one accustomed, at the word of his commander, to rush fearlessly on the very bayonets of his foe, will scruple more to drive a stiletto into the heart of one he knows to be his personal enemy, than to slaughter his fellow-creatures, merely because bidden to do so by one he is bound to obey?

I would not choose to see the man against whom I pleaded smile, as though in mockery of my words. No; my pride is to see the accused pale, agitated, and as though beaten out of all composure by the fire of my eloquence. Upon my word, you killed him ere the executioner had laid his hand upon him. Nowadays the military profession is in abeyance and the magisterial robe is the badge of honor.

There is a wise Latin proverb that is very much in point. Do you know I always felt a shudder at the idea of even a destroying angel? I should myself have recommended the match, had not the noble marquis anticipated my wishes by requesting my consent to it. What is there I would not do to evince my earnest gratitude!

Now, then, were a conspirator to fall into your hands, he would be most welcome. Villefort immediately rose from table and quitted the room upon the plea of urgent business; he soon, however, returned, his whole face beaming with delight. Well, I at least resemble the disciples of Esculapius in one thing [people spoke in this style in ], that of not being able to call a day my own, not even that of my betrothal.

You know we cannot yet pronounce him guilty. The young man passed round to the side of the table where the fair pleader sat, and leaning over her chair said tenderly:. I should be glad to know what connection there can possibly be between your sickly sentimentality and the affairs of the state!

N o sooner had Villefort left the salon, than he assumed the grave air of a man who holds the balance of life and death in his hands. Now, in spite of the nobility of his countenance, the command of which, like a finished actor, he had carefully studied before the glass, it was by no means easy for him to assume an air of judicial severity. Already rich, he held a high official situation, though only twenty-seven. These considerations naturally gave Villefort a feeling of such complete felicity that his mind was fairly dazzled in its contemplation.

At the door he met the commissary of police, who was waiting for him. At this moment, and as Villefort had arrived at the corner of the Rue des Conseils, a man, who seemed to have been waiting for him, approached; it was M. He is the most estimable, the most trustworthy creature in the world, and I will venture to say, there is not a better seaman in all the merchant service.

Oh, M. Villefort, as we have seen, belonged to the aristocratic party at Marseilles, Morrel to the plebeian; the first was a royalist, the other suspected of Bonapartism.

Villefort looked disdainfully at Morrel, and replied coldly:. Is it not true? The magistrate laid emphasis on these words, as if he wished to apply them to the owner himself, while his eyes seemed to plunge into the heart of one who, interceding for another, had himself need of indulgence.

He replied, however, in a tone of deep interest:. He was, if I recollect, arrested in a tavern, in company with a great many others. As he had now arrived at the door of his own house, which adjoined the Palais de Justice, he entered, after having, coldly saluted the shipowner, who stood, as if petrified, on the spot where Villefort had left him.

The antechamber was full of police agents and gendarmes, in the midst of whom, carefully watched, but calm and smiling, stood the prisoner. He had recognized intelligence in the high forehead, courage in the dark eye and bent brow, and frankness in the thick lips that showed a set of pearly teeth. He stifled, therefore, the feelings of compassion that were rising, composed his features, and sat down, grim and sombre, at his desk.

He was pale, but calm and collected, and saluting his judge with easy politeness, looked round for a seat, as if he had been in M. I am hardly nineteen; I know nothing; I have no part to play. If I obtain the situation I desire, I shall owe it to M. Thus all my opinions—I will not say public, but private—are confined to these three sentiments,—I love my father, I respect M.

This, sir, is all I can tell you, and you see how uninteresting it is. I shall have at least a pressure of the hand in public, and a sweet kiss in private. As for my disposition, that is, perhaps, somewhat too hasty; but I have striven to repress it. I have had ten or twelve sailors under me, and if you question them, they will tell you that they love and respect me, not as a father, for I am too young, but as an elder brother.

You are about to become captain at nineteen—an elevated post; you are about to marry a pretty girl, who loves you; and these two pieces of good fortune may have excited the envy of someone. You seem a worthy young man; I will depart from the strict line of my duty to aid you in discovering the author of this accusation.

Here is the paper; do you know the writing? A cloud passed over his brow as he said:. Whoever did it writes well. I will tell you the real facts.

As we had no doctor on board, and he was so anxious to arrive at Elba, that he would not touch at any other port, his disorder rose to such a height, that at the end of the third day, feeling he was dying, he called me to him.

You will accomplish what I was to have done, and derive all the honor and profit from it. At these words he gave me a ring. It was time—two hours after he was delirious; the next day he died. Everywhere the last requests of a dying man are sacred; but with a sailor the last requests of his superior are commands. I sailed for the Island of Elba, where I arrived the next day; I ordered everybody to remain on board, and went on shore alone. As I had expected, I found some difficulty in obtaining access to the grand-marshal; but I sent the ring I had received from the captain to him, and was instantly admitted.

I undertook it because it was what my captain had bade me do. I landed here, regulated the affairs of the vessel, and hastened to visit my affianced bride, whom I found more lovely than ever. Thanks to M. Morrel, all the forms were got over; in a word I was, as I told you, at my marriage feast; and I should have been married in an hour, and tomorrow I intended to start for Paris, had I not been arrested on this charge which you as well as I now see to be unjust.

If you have been culpable, it was imprudence, and this imprudence was in obedience to the orders of your captain. Give up this letter you have brought from Elba, and pass your word you will appear should you be required, and go and rejoin your friends.

He sank into his seat, and hastily turning over the packet, drew forth the fatal letter, at which he glanced with an expression of terror. After reading the letter, Villefort covered his face with his hands. You are ill—shall I ring for assistance? It is for me to give orders here, and not you. Attend to yourself; answer me. Villefort fell back on his chair, passed his hand over his brow, moist with perspiration, and, for the third time, read the letter.

Should anyone else interrogate you, say to him what you have said to me, but do not breathe a word of this letter. Villefort rang. A police agent entered. Villefort whispered some words in his ear, to which the officer replied by a motion of his head. Hardly had the door closed when Villefort threw himself half-fainting into a chair. This accursed letter would have destroyed all my hopes. Oh, my father, must your past career always interfere with my successes? Now to the work I have in hand. A door that communicated with the Palais de Justice was opened, and they went through a long range of gloomy corridors, whose appearance might have made even the boldest shudder.

The Palais de Justice communicated with the prison,—a sombre edifice, that from its grated windows looks on the clock-tower of the Accoules. The door opened, the two gendarmes gently pushed him forward, and the door closed with a loud sound behind him. The air he inhaled was no longer pure, but thick and mephitic,—he was in prison.

He was conducted to a tolerably neat chamber, but grated and barred, and its appearance, therefore, did not greatly alarm him; besides, the words of Villefort, who seemed to interest himself so much, resounded still in his ears like a promise of freedom.

It was, as we have said, the 1st of March, and the prisoner was soon buried in darkness. He had advanced at first, but stopped at the sight of this display of force. A carriage waited at the door, the coachman was on the box, and a police officer sat beside him. The prisoner glanced at the windows—they were grated; he had changed his prison for another that was conveying him he knew not whither.

Soon he saw the lights of La Consigne. The two gendarmes who were opposite to him descended first, then he was ordered to alight and the gendarmes on each side of him followed his example. They advanced towards a boat, which a custom-house officer held by a chain, near the quay. In an instant he was placed in the stern-sheets of the boat, between the gendarmes, while the officer stationed himself at the bow; a shove sent the boat adrift, and four sturdy oarsmen impelled it rapidly towards the Pilon.

The boat continued her voyage. The most vague and wild thoughts passed through his mind. The boat they were in could not make a long voyage; there was no vessel at anchor outside the harbor; he thought, perhaps, they were going to leave him on some distant point. He was not bound, nor had they made any attempt to handcuff him; this seemed a good augury. Besides, had not the deputy, who had been so kind to him, told him that provided he did not pronounce the dreaded name of Noirtier, he had nothing to apprehend?

Had not Villefort in his presence destroyed the fatal letter, the only proof against him? They had left the Ile Ratonneau, where the lighthouse stood, on the right, and were now opposite the Point des Catalans. A loud cry could be heard by her. But pride restrained him and he did not utter it. What would his guards think if they heard him shout like a madman?

An intervening elevation of land hid the light. While he had been absorbed in thought, they had shipped their oars and hoisted sail; the boat was now moving with the wind.

You see I cannot escape, even if I intended. I have committed no crime. Come, come, do not look so astonished, or you will make me think you are laughing at me in return for my good nature. But what are you doing? Help, comrades, help! He fell back cursing with rage. Believe soft-spoken gentlemen again! Hark ye, my friend, I have disobeyed my first order, but I will not disobey the second; and if you move, I will blow your brains out.

For a moment the idea of struggling crossed his mind, and of so ending the unexpected evil that had overtaken him.

But he bethought him of M. He remained motionless, but gnashing his teeth and wringing his hands with fury. At this moment the boat came to a landing with a violent shock. His guards, taking him by the arms and coat-collar, forced him to rise, and dragged him towards the steps that lead to the gate of the fortress, while the police officer carrying a musket with fixed bayonet followed behind.

He did not even see the ocean, that terrible barrier against freedom, which the prisoners look upon with utter despair. They halted for a minute, during which he strove to collect his thoughts.

He looked around; he was in a court surrounded by high walls; he heard the measured tread of sentinels, and as they passed before the light he saw the barrels of their muskets shine. They waited upwards of ten minutes. They seemed awaiting orders. The orders came. Tomorrow, perhaps, he may change you. In the meantime there is bread, water, and fresh straw; and that is all a prisoner can wish for. He found the prisoner in the same position, as if fixed there, his eyes swollen with weeping.

He had passed the night standing, and without sleep. He touched him on the shoulder. Edmond started. All his emotion then burst forth; he cast himself on the ground, weeping bitterly, and asking himself what crime he had committed that he was thus punished.

The day passed thus; he scarcely tasted food, but walked round and round the cell like a wild beast in its cage. He had no fears as to how he should live—good seamen are welcome everywhere. The next morning at the same hour, the jailer came again.

The jailer saw by his tone he would be happy to die; and as every prisoner is worth ten sous a day to his jailer, he replied in a more subdued tone. I will make you another offer. I will send word to the governor. The jailer went out, and returned in an instant with a corporal and four soldiers. He descended fifteen steps, and the door of a dungeon was opened, and he was thrust in.

Now, excuse the indiscretion, marquis, but have you any landed property? And, sitting down, he wrote a letter to his broker, ordering him to sell out at the market price. Revenge -- Fiction. Adventure stories. Prisoners -- Fiction. France -- History -- 19th century -- Fiction. Pirates -- Fiction. Read this book online: HTML. EPUB with images. The Count of Monte Cristo. Online library.

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