derek bailey and the story of free improvisation

derek bailey and the story of free improvisation

This brilliant biography of the cult guitar player will likely cause you to abandon everything you thought you knew about jazz improvisation, post-punk and the avant-garde. Derek Bailey was at the top of his profession as a dance band and recordsession guitarist when, in the early s, he began playing an uncompromisingly abstract form of music. Review our guidelines for visitors and other updates on hours and services at Harvard Book Store this summer.

I don't agree with him, but his comparison between the American minimalists the transcendent composers and the improvisers direct and materialist is worth thinking about. Futhermore, you will learn about the wider universe of the genre through the likes of Chick Corea, John Zorn, and even Buckethead along the way, which is great for fans of this kind of music.

Sadly this book won't appeal to anyone other than hardcore Bailey or improv fans, as it is not a 'user friendly book', not taking any pains to introduce the field to newcomers. It could almost be three stars as there are decent moments, but I can't seriously say I'd get friends to read this. Shelves: kindle. As others have noted, there are 4 types of content in this book Long interviews with Derek Bailey himself, a lively chap with a mature perspective on music and improvisation that's both principled and practice-based; 2.

Quotes from Bailey's peers, curated by Watson to form an insightful if incomplete picture; 3. A whole lot of concert and record reviews, which is after all Watson's bread and butter; 4. Shoehorning of Marx and Zappa into each and every page of the godda As others have noted, there are 4 types of content in this book Shoehorning of Marx and Zappa into each and every page of the goddamn book.

Now, if some Marxist perspective is always welcome although Watson's approach is self-consciously polemical and the confrontational tone gets tedious quick , unless you're a big Zappa fan you probably won't appreciate all the forced parallels - Bailey himself didn't like Zappa, but apparently he reluctantly humoured Watson's excesses. Hence, the author seems to say, so should we. Still, Watson's expertise of the field is remarkable especially for the pre-youtube era and there's a whole lot of interesting springboards to be bookmarked and pursued.

This is a great book. It's much more than a biography, it's also a polemic on music, the music industry, capitalism, art, and popular culture.

Anyone interested in free improv should read it, but also anyone interested in alternatives to the corporate monolith of commercial music would find it worth while to at least check it out.

That said I think the book is a bit too long. There's extensive appendices which I think some of the main text should have been moved to, because there's a lot that I This is a great book. There's extensive appendices which I think some of the main text should have been moved to, because there's a lot that I would consider "optional".

This is especially true of the long chapter about Bailey's Company Weeks, in which the author exhaustively details every night of every Company week from like to or whenever they stopped. It's somewhat interesting to get this deep dive into all these improvisors, but it was just long exhausting slog to get through it all. But anyway, Ben Watson is a great critic and writer, a superfan and a true radical, and I am motivated to look for some of his other books.

Feb 06, RA rated it it was amazing Shelves: cultural-conglomerate , history , informative-somehow , music-stuff , socio-political.

Ben Watson's bio of the iconic Derek Bailey, the pioneer of free-improve music, especially free-improv guitar. Lots of detail about numerous "concerts," "gigs," venues, presentation, etc.

Plenty of Derek's own voice, and the voices of those who have played and worked with him. A somewhat Marxist analysis of music, and the "business' of music; but with some self-critical comments added in, at times. I was totally energized by this, and hope to move forward with my own necessary and inherent free-improv guitar. Sep 27, Stewart Smith rated it really liked it.

I'm less stringent in my approach, but Watson's critique of liberal arts discourse is highly pertinent. Certainly there are moments where my eyebrows were raised, but it's a stimulating read and often very funny. This isn't a straightforward biography, but the long interview with Bailey is a wonderful read, and while Watson's detailed accounts o "As an Adornite This isn't a straightforward biography, but the long interview with Bailey is a wonderful read, and while Watson's detailed accounts of Bailey's festivals and recordings can be a bit much all at once, they're full of colourful descriptions and insight.

Jan 23, David Keffer rated it really liked it Shelves: music. Like most reviews of this book, I point out that there are two parts. The first part is a biography of Bailey, with lots of quotes. It is a wonderful read.

Bailey's personality comes through and the book is delightful and very funny. The second half of the book is composed of concert reviews and was pretty boring.

This brilliant biography of the cult guitar player makes you forget everything you think you know about jazz improvisation, post punk and the avant-garde Derek Bailey was at the top of his profession as a dance-band and record-session guitarist when, in the early s, he began playing an uncompromisingly abstract music.

As the Joseph Holbrooke Trio, with bassist Gavin Bryars and drummer Tony Oxley, Bailey forged a musical syntax which has since operated as an international counter to the banality of commercialism.

Refusing to be labeled a "jazz" guitarist, Bailey has collaborated with performance artists, electronic experimentalists, classical musicians, Zen dancers, tap dancers, rock stars, jazzers, poets, weirdos and an endless stream of fiercely individual musicians. Derek Bailey was at the top of his profession as a dance band and recordsession guitarist when, in the early s, he began playing an uncompromisingly abstract form of music. His indecent decency.

Add to Cart. Also available from:. Edited by Jordan T. Camp and Christina Heatherton. Futures of Black Radicalism.

This brilliant biography of the cult guitar derek bailey and the story of free improvisation makes you forget everything you think you know about jazz improvisation, post punk and the avant-garde Derek Bailey was at the top of his profession as a dance-band and record-session guitarist when, in the early s, he began playing an uncompromisingly abstract music. As od Joseph Holbrooke Trio, with bassist Gavin Bryars and drummer Tony Oxley, Bailey forged a musical syntax which has since operated as an international counter to the banality of commercialism. Refusing to cree labeled a "jazz" guitarist, Bailey has collaborated with performance artists, electronic experimentalists, classical musicians, Zen dancers, tap dancers, rock stars, jazzers, poets, weirdos and an endless stream of fiercely individual musicians. Derek Bailey and the Story of Free Improvisation lifts the lid on an artistic ferment which has defied every known law of the music business. Telling the story via taped interviews with Bailey and his cohorts, gig reports and album reviews including an exhaustive discography of Bailey's vast and hard-to-track outputBen Watson's spiky, partisan and often very funny derek bailey and the story of free improvisation argues that anyone who thought the avant-garde was dead simply forgot to listen. Derek Bailey derek bailey and the story of free improvisation the Story of Free Improvisation. Ben Watson. Child and Teenager Working Guitarist Joseph Free mobile mon compte en ligne Trio Soloism and Freedom Company Weeks On Improvisation. A Derek Bailey Discography. An Derek bailey and the story of free improvisation Discography. Derek Baileys Complete Invisible. derek bailey and the story of free improvisation A brilliant biography of Derek Bailey the pioneering guitarist that just got tired of cranking out MOR sessions, broke away (even from jazz) and headed for the free​. Book Review. Derek Bailey and the Story of Free Improvisation. Ben Watson London: Verso, ISBN: pages. Reviewed by Scott Thomson. Derek Bailey and the Story of Free Improvisation. Front Cover · Ben Watson. Verso, - Music - About Derek Bailey and the Story of Free Improvisation. This brilliant biography of the cult guitar player will likely cause you to abandon everything you thought. Derek Bailey and the Story of Free Improvisation book. Read 21 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. This outstanding biography of the. Derek-baileyst. Verso__1___3_derek_bailey__pb__cmyk_dpi_site. Derek Bailey. And the Story of Free Improvisation. by Ben Watson. Bailey comes across as a dry wit refreshingly free of ideology or hot air: “When somebody says they would rather work in a factory than play music. This brilliant biography of the cult guitar player will likely cause you to abandon everything you thought you knew about jazz improvisation, post-punk and the. This brilliant biography of the cult guitar player will likely cause you to abandon everything you thought you knew about jazz improvisation. Somewhere about half way through the book it switched to reviews of material and shows. Still, this proves my point in a way; The book is too long. Deals and Shenanigans. Lots of detail about numerous "concerts," "gigs," venues, presentation, etc. Bailey's personality comes through and the book is delightful and very funny. He writes in extreme detail about small events. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number. Approach with caution; Bailey's own book on Improvisation is significantly more penetrable and welcoming. Other editions. Site Section:. Derek Bailey. His attack, his singularity. Community Reviews. Although Watson did a good job of it, and even defended this shift adequately, it still lost steam and therefore interest. Bailey has invented an entirely new way of playing the guitar, very loosely derived from the mature work of Anton Webern but entirely his own. derek bailey and the story of free improvisation