free online psychometric test for students we have everything we could ever need, we're not quite sure how word deal with it. Practical advice is given on how to overcome this more-more culture - breakiny as websites where you can donate things and pick enough breaking free from the world of more unwanted items for free less carbon footprintspending time in meditation, being grateful, reading poetry, playing music, types of breaks you should take, etc At the end of each chapter, there are thought-provoking questions and statements which will really get you thinking about the topic just consumed. About John Naish.">

enough breaking free from the world of more

enough breaking free from the world of more

You are commenting using your Twitter account. You are commenting using your Facebook account. Notify me of new comments via email. Notify me of new posts via email. Our culture keeps telling us that we don't yet have all we need to be happy, but in fact we need to nurture a new skill - the ability to bask in the bounties all around us.

ENOUGH explores how our Neolithic brain-wiring spurs us to build a world of overabundance that keeps us hooked on 'more'. How does Amazon calculate star ratings?

The model takes into account factors including the age of a rating, whether the ratings are from verified purchasers, and factors that establish reviewer trustworthiness. Top Reviews Most recent Top Reviews. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Verified Purchase. It seems ironic to post about this book on Amazon, a global marketplace who's success is ultimately defined by us living in complete contradiction to this book's message, and spending our hard earned money via targeted advertising - however, this book isn't about minimalism, and it's not about avoiding shopping.

It's about understanding what drives us to desire more, and examines the difference between want and need. It's about re-establishing what "enough" is for us, and speaking with friends who have read it, we all came away with a definition - albeit each of us happy to re-adjust our perspectives to be more content with what we already have in different areas of our lives rather than constantly chasing the impossible.

My interpretation is that: If we universally desire less, we can be content with less. This doesn't mean settling for second best - but it means re-evaluating what is important to us - going after what we want, and not what society and marketing tells us we should want. So long as we covet the latest "thing" we are always disappointed, because whoever makes that thing will inevitably and quickly make a new version of it that antiquates the model you bought, leaving you feeling behind the curve until you get the newest incarnation.

Think of that friend who is embarrassed because they have the old shape iPhone - and keeps saying they need to upgrade it and ask, how did we really get here as a society?! Naish tells us that following this trend of always wanting more becomes a game you can't win - and if that is your pursuit of happiness, it's unattainable.

It doesn't just cover rampant materialism either - but also our attitudes to food, happiness, body image, and the list continues I started reading enough based on the cover image, as it resonated with my feelings that society is too materialistic - yet came away realising that "enoughism" permeates far more of our lives than just how we spend money. I've read this book slowly, and enjoyed it.

Whilst it is certainly something you could blitz through and digest an overall moral message, I've tried to implement chapter by chapter before moving onto another to see what effect it has had on me - and whilst i'd debate the accuracy of some of the statements - I believe the overall message is one that would benefit the world if more people could read it - which is why my copy is now doing the rounds by post, from friend to friend to pass the material on.

Sorry Mr. Naish - but I am sure you'll agree that if I outright bought copy after copy for people I think need it - I've kind of missed the point. Sign in. Accessibility help Skip to navigation Skip to content Skip to footer. Choose your subscription. Trial Not sure which package to choose? Practical advice is given on how to overcome this more-more culture - such as websites where you can donate things and pick up unwanted items for free less carbon footprint , spending time in meditation, being grateful, reading poetry, playing music, types of breaks you should take, etc At the end of each chapter, there are thought-provoking questions and statements which will really get you thinking about the topic just consumed.

A great read if you want to live a fulfilling life that not only benefits you but others, without wanting to keep up with the Joneses. May 21, Lisa rated it liked it Shelves: sustainability , politics. Naish has a lot of fascinating statistics and anecdotes about consumer culture, but it becomes increasingly maddening the extent to which he sees this as a primarily consumer problem. Policymakers, businesses, activists are nowhere to be found. He disses one movement that is doing the work he says needs to be done--voluntary simplicity, whose message is practically what Naish calls for--and ignores another.

When he finally sits down with Tim Jackson and the word "degrowth" could finally appe Naish has a lot of fascinating statistics and anecdotes about consumer culture, but it becomes increasingly maddening the extent to which he sees this as a primarily consumer problem. When he finally sits down with Tim Jackson and the word "degrowth" could finally appear, Naish "agrees to disagree" that systemic change needs to happen at the policy level.

This could be a decent introduction to get a personal sense of sufficiency, but the sheer number of blind spots make it hard to recommend.

Nevertheless, it is certainly the case that certain aspects of this book mindfulness and intention have certainly gained prominence in recent years. Apr 22, Mainichi66 rated it it was amazing. I thought I am a Zen savvy. This book tell me I am not even close. It turns out this book is much above what i have expected what it might say about this topic. The author really has something to offer especially were the reader the one share the same vex and entanglement of life and mind.

May 16, Akash rated it it was ok Shelves: non-fiction. Its very repetitive, has a lot of fillers and plenty of rhetoric as well. Journalist John Naish is an ardent environmentalist and anti-consumer campaigner. He's the brain behind the Landfill Prize for example and Naish wants to start a movement of 'enoughness'. In essence Naish says, rightly, that we've lost all sense of what is enough in our lives. We do not know when to stop and this inability is hurting ourselves, our societies and our planet.

Rediscovering a sense of 'enough' is necessary, essential even for our survival. Through seven chapters information, food, s Journalist John Naish is an ardent environmentalist and anti-consumer campaigner. Through seven chapters information, food, stuff, work, options, happiness, growth Naish looks at how having more than enough is self-defeating and that discovering when we have enough is liberating.

There's much to commend it and it makes a lot of sense. Not knowing when we've eaten enough will lead us to being obese, having too many options makes it harder to make a good choice, thinking we are not happy enough is a thankless task and so on. Naish thinks that the clues to why we don't know when we've had enough lies in the human brain, we have evolved this way to survive but now that our survival is rarely threatened by scarcity we need to fight our own brain wiring to learn new ways of thinking and living.

It's an interesting argument, but from a Christian perspective we would agree that humanity is wired to want more than we need greed and that reason is because we are fallen, sinful creatures. Naish also embraces the spiritual, he advocates saying grace at meals despite not really believing in God and praying or meditating and even practising a 'sabbath'.

It's a bit odd in the usual ways those who reject 'religion' but embrace 'the spiritual' are because it's whatever you want it to be which usually ends up being not very much, while truth gets conveniently left at the yoga mat. Enough is strongest in its analysis of the problem, with wry humour he skewers much of modern consumptive society in all its bloated glory but weakest when it comes to proposing solutions.

It knocks self-help but in a framework of non-faith, if we don't help ourselves who will? The gospel says we are liberated from our sinful passions and desires at the cross. Having said that I wish more churches would teach and practice 'enoughness'.

Very interesting indeed! Add to that that it is nearly a decade old and wider society doesn't apear to have taken note of any of the dangers outlined by Naish Enough - Breaking free from the world of more.

Amazing, Interesting, Refreshing and Fantastic book! Please buy or read this book - it's really enlightening. I couldn't put this one down and read the whole thing in one sitting, about 7 hours. It talks about how basically - in our lives - we have everything we could possibly need, but we still feel unsatisfied and nothing is ever enough. It talks about really interesting side-effects of this basic human condition, such as we have more than enough foo Enough - Breaking free from the world of more.

It talks about really interesting side-effects of this basic human condition, such as we have more than enough food to get by but people still feel the need to eat more and we have problems with obesity. We always have the need for the newest greatest electronic gadget, information overload through internet, tv, cellphones, etc, and the need to always feel "happier" and that better times lay ahead.

Something akin to - we're always channel surfing because although we like what we have right now, we're always looking for something better out there to switch to. Like how we can have trouble committing to a relationship, or job, or even a pair of shoes, because the next one promises to be better than the one you have now.

Basically our human condition is not used to overabundance, and now that we have everything we could ever need, we're not quite sure how to deal with it. Imagine all the clothes and shoes and bags we have in our closets but we never use.

The amount of clutter we accumulate that we don't really use or need. It's an interesting theory, that our somewhat irrational consumer habits are the result of ancient survival mechanisms. In order to create more a sustainable future, we need to learn to recognize enough when we see it, and evolve a stop button.

For millions of years, humankind has used a brilliantly successful survival strategy. If we like something, we chase after more of it: more status, more food, more info, more stuff. Then enough breaking free from the world of more chase again. Its how enough breaking free from the world of more survived famine, disease and disaster to colonise the world. But now, thanks to technology, weve suddenly got more of everything than we can ever use, enjoy or afford. That doesnt stop us from striving though and its making us sick, tired, overweight, angry and in debt. It burns up our personal ecologies and the planets ecology too. We urgently need to develop a sense of enough. Our culture keeps telling us that we dont yet have all we need to be happy, but in fact we need to nurture a new skill the ability to bask in the bounties all around us. ENOUGH explores how our Neolithic brain-wiring spurs us to build a world of overabundance that keeps us hooked on more. John explains how, through adopting the art of enoughness, we can break from this wrecking cycle. With ten chapters on topics such as Enough food, Enough stuff, Enough hurry and Enough information, he explores how we created the problem and gives us practical ways to make our lives better. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you enough breaking free from the world of more start reading Kindle books on enough breaking free from the world of more smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. To get the free app, enter your mobile difference between a free school and an academy number. Would you like to tell us about a lower price? If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support? Read more Read less. Enough breaking free from the world of more offers and product promotions Amazon Business : For business-exclusive pricing, quantity discounts and downloadable VAT invoices. Create a free account. enough breaking free from the world of more Buy Enough: Breaking Free from the World of More on indiaecoadventures.com ✓ FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders. Enough book. Read 57 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. For millions of years, humankind has used a brilliantly successful survival. Enough: Breaking Free from the World of More. Front Cover. John Naish. Hodder & Stoughton, - Conduct of life - pages. 1 Review. For millions of. LibraryThing Review. User Review - Steve55 - LibraryThing. In 'Enough' John Naish presents a coherent and well-argued case for change with a dash of reality​. The author argues we need to develop a cultural sense of "enough-ness" and to be happy with what we HAVE Enough: Breaking Free from the World of More. Buy Enough: Breaking Free from the World of Excess by Naish, John (ISBN: If we like something, we chase after more of it: more status, more food, more info. Book: Enough: Breaking free from the world of moreAuthor: John Naish ()​Review: A fascinating insight into the psychology, sociology and. Enough: Breaking Free From the World of More By John Naish Hodder & Stoughton £, pages. FT Bookshop price: £ Jan 27, - Enough: Breaking Free from the World of More By John Naish. Nuh Keller - An epitome of the book, Enough: Breaking Free from the World of Excess by John Naish. | Previous track Play or pause track Next track. Cancel Forgot your password? Also I can't help thinking that to properly appreciate said gems you'd probably have to know what they are in the first place to be able to find them, and then what would be the point of reading the book? It talks about really interesting side-effects of this basic human condition, such as we have more than enough food to get by but people still feel the need to eat more and we have problems with obesity. Dec 23, Jo rated it it was ok. But large parts of the book had a rather depressing feel, which despite I imagine being unintentional, it still just felt a bit like a long list of things which are wrong with society today. We urgently need to develop a sense of enough. Practical advice is given on how to overcome this more-more culture - A well-researched book on what 'enoughism' is. Details if other :. Read more I guess any sort of minimalist book will try to cut off things that you might place importance on. So I took the author's message to heart and skipped through parts of the book because I didn't need an overwhelm Well I do love a good thought-provoking book, and parts of this book were certainly that. John explains how, through adopting the art of enoughness, we can break from this wrecking cycle. John Naish is a British health journalist, currently writing for The Times. John Naish. enough breaking free from the world of more